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DIPLOMATIC HISTORY

The discipline of Diplomatic History analyses the relations between states –as the main actors of the field of International Relations- by touching upon their domestic political developments as well. The Section of Diplomatic History deals with the basic events in the world since the 7000’s B.C. in the undergraduate courses of Diplomatic History I, II and III. In line with its chronogical precedence in History, the teaching of Diplomatic History at the earliest stage of the undergraduate program serves also as a basis for the other main courses of the Department, namely International Law and International Politics (Theories of International Relations).

The Section of Diplomatic History, apart from those general (world) history courses, also submits in both undergraduate and graduate levels, other courses related with methodology (methodology of history) and special diplomatic history subjects (for example Ottoman and Turkish foreign policy, regional political courses like Eurasia and Middle East, etc.).

A short history of the Section of Diplomativ History, which is, indeed –parallelling its primary status in the field of International Relations- one of the oldest in our Faculty, is as follows:

The proclamation of the Second Constitutional Era in 1908 affected not only the political structure of the Ottoman Empire, but its social and cultural life as well. In consequence of these changed conditions, Diplomatic History, as a new course, was introduced into the syllabuses of the main schools in the country. This course was first taught in the Military Academy in the autumn of 1908, concruently with “Mülkiye” (the Ottoman predecessor of our present Faculty). In the Republican Era, the Diplomatic History course continued to be taught by the Section of Diplomatic History which was established in the meantime.

For detailed information about the academic staff of the Section, please click here.


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